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dc.contributor.authorSalanova, Marisa
dc.contributor.authorLlorens, Susana
dc.contributor.authorCifre, Eva
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T11:36:51Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T11:36:51Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifier.citationSALANOVA, Marisa; LLORENS, Susana; CIFRE, Eva. The dark side of technologies: Technostress among users of information and communication technologies. International Journal of Psychology, 2013, 48.3: 422-436.ca_CA
dc.identifier.issn0020-7594
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10234/87250
dc.description.abstractThis paper tests the structure and the predictors of two psychological experiences of technostress associated with the use of information and communication technologies (ICT), i.e., technostrain (users report feelings of anxiety, fatigue, scepticism and inefficacy beliefs related to the use of technologies) and technoaddiction (users feel bad due to an excessive and compulsive use of these technologies). The study included a sample of 1072 ICT users (N = 675 nonintensive ICT users and N = 397 intensive ICT users). Results from multigroup confirmatory factor analyses among non-intensive and intensive ICT users showed, as expected, the four-factor structure of technostrain in both samples. Secondly, and also as expected, confirmatory factorial analyses revealed that technostress experiences are characterized not only by technostrain but also by an excessive and compulsive use of ICT. Moreover, multiple analyses of variance showed significant differences between non-intensive and intensive ICT users (1) in the dimensions of technostress and (2) in specific job demands and job/personal resources. Finally, linear multiple regression analyses revealed that technostrain is positively predicted by work overload, role ambiguity, emotional overload, mobbing and obstacles hindering ICT use, as well as by lack of autonomy, transformational leadership, social support, ICT use facilitators and mental competences. Work overload, role ambiguity and mobbing, as well as the lack of emotional competences, positively predict technoaddiction. Theoretical and practical implications, in addition to future research, are discussed.ca_CA
dc.format.extent15 p.ca_CA
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfca_CA
dc.language.isoengca_CA
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisca_CA
dc.relation.isPartOfInternational Journal of Psychology, 2013, 48.3ca_CA
dc.rights© 2012 International Union of Psychological Science © 2013 Taylor & Francis Groupca_CA
dc.subjectTechnostressca_CA
dc.subjectTechnostrainca_CA
dc.subjectTechnoaddictionca_CA
dc.subjectICTca_CA
dc.titleThe dark side of technologies: Technostress among users of information and communication technologiesca_CA
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_CA
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1080/00207594.2012.680460
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_CA
dc.relation.publisherVersionhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00207594.2012.680460ca_CA


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