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dc.contributor.authorPerseguer Torregrosa, Zeneida
dc.contributor.authorOrozco Beltrán, Domingo
dc.contributor.authorGil Guillén, Vicente F.
dc.contributor.authorPita Fernández, Salvador
dc.contributor.authorCarratalá Munuera, Concepción
dc.contributor.authorPallarés-Carratalá, Vicente
dc.contributor.authorLópez Pineda, Adriana
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-08T11:48:45Z
dc.date.available2015-07-08T11:48:45Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.identifier.citationPERSEGUER-TORREGROSA, Zeneida, et al. Magnitude of Pharmacological Nonadherence in Hypertensive Patients Taking Antihypertensive Medication from a Community Pharmacy in Spain. J Manag Care Pharm, 2014, 20.12: 1217-25.ca_CA
dc.identifier.issn1083-4087
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10234/126774
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The most common factor associated with poor control of hypertension is treatment nonadherence to antihypertensive drug therapy. OBJECTIVE: To measure drug nonadherence and associated factors in pharmacologically treated hypertensive patients. METHODS: A prospective observational study was carried out from March 2007 to August 2009 at a community pharmacy in Spain. A pharmacist invited a convenience sample of hypertensive patients aged 50 years and older taking antihypertensive medication for at least 3 months prior to participate in the study. Drug nonadherence was analyzed by 3 separate methods: pill count, as the gold standard method, and Haynes-Sackett and Morisky-Green questionnaires. A descriptive analysis of drug nonadherence and variables associated with nonadherence was performed. Logistic regression models were used to determine the variables associated with nonadherence. RESULTS: Data were recorded from 419 patients. The drug nonadherence ratio varied depending on the method used: 62.8% by pill count, 3.1% by the Haynes-Sackett self-report test, and 36% according to the Morisky-Green test. In the multivariate model, the variable associated with a decrease in drug nonadherence was years of known hypertension (OR=0.962, 95% CI=0.937-0.988), and the variables associated with an increase in drug nonadherence were loose-pill combination therapy versus fixed-dose combination therapy or monotherapy (OR=4.099, 95% CI=2.494-6.757) and good perception of quality of life (OR=1.276, 95% CI=1.109-1.471). CONCLUSIONS: The magnitude of drug nonadherence varies depending on the method of measurement. The pill count method (reference method) revealed that 2 out of 3 patients with hypertension did not have good adherence. This study highlights the lack of antihypertensive drug adherence and the pharmacist’s ability to detect the assca_CA
dc.format.extent9 p.ca_CA
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfca_CA
dc.language.isoengca_CA
dc.publisherAcademy of Managed Care Pharmacyca_CA
dc.relation.isPartOfJ Manag Care Pharm, 2014, 20.12ca_CA
dc.rightsCopyright ©2014, Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy. All rights reserved. (Non‐Commercial Academic Use Only)ca_CA
dc.subjecthypertensionca_CA
dc.subjectdrug nonadherenceca_CA
dc.subjecthypertensive patientsca_CA
dc.subjectSpainca_CA
dc.titleMagnitude of pharmacological nonadherence in hypertensive patients taking antihypertensive medication from a community pharmacy in Spainca_CA
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_CA
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_CA
dc.relation.publisherVersionhttp://www.amcp.org/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=18842ca_CA


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