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dc.contributor.authorSanMiguel, Noemí
dc.contributor.authorPardo, Marta
dc.contributor.authorCarratalá Ros, Carla
dc.contributor.authorLópez Cruz, Laura
dc.contributor.authorSalamone, John D.
dc.contributor.authorCorrea Sanz, Mercè
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-05T10:17:18Z
dc.date.available2018-10-05T10:17:18Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationSANMIGUEL, Noemí, et al. Individual differences in the energizing effects of caffeine on effort-based decision-making tests in rats. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 2018, vol. 169, p. 27-34.ca_CA
dc.identifier.issn0091-3057
dc.identifier.issn1873-5177
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10234/176597
dc.description.abstractMotivated behavior is characterized by activation and high work output. Nucleus accumbens (Nacb) modulates behavioral activation and effort-based decision-making. Caffeine is widely consumed because of its energizing properties. This methylxanthine is a non-selective adenosine A1/A2A receptor antagonist. Adenosine receptors are highly concentrated in Nacb. Adenosine agonists injected into Nacb, shift preference towards low effort alternatives. The present studies characterized effort-related effects of caffeine in a concurrent progressive ratio (PROG)/free reinforcer choice procedure that requires high levels of work output, and generates great variability among different animals. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received an acute dose of caffeine (2.5–20.0 mg/kg, IP) and 30 min later were tested in operant boxes. One group was food-restricted and had to lever pressed for high carbohydrate pellets, another group was non-food-restricted and lever pressed for a high sucrose solution. Caffeine (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg) increased lever pressing in food-restricted animals that were already high responders. However, in non-restricted animals, caffeine (5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg) increased work output only among low responders. In fact, caffeine (10.0 and 20.0 mg/kg) in non-restricted animals, reduced lever pressing among high responders in the PROG task, and also in a different group of animals lever pressing in an easy task (fixed ratio 7 schedule) that uniformly generates high levels of responding. Caffeine did not modify sucrose preference or consumption under free access conditions. Thus, when animals do not have a homeostatic need, caffeine can help those not very intrinsically motivated to work harder for a more palatable reward. However, caffeine can disrupt performance of animals intrinsically motivated to work hard for a better reward.ca_CA
dc.format.extent8 p.ca_CA
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfca_CA
dc.language.isoengca_CA
dc.publisherElsevierca_CA
dc.relation.isPartOfPharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, Volume 169, June 2018.ca_CA
dc.subjectCaffeineca_CA
dc.subjectAdenosine antagonistsca_CA
dc.subjectMethylxanthinesca_CA
dc.subjectBehavioral activationca_CA
dc.subjectAppetiteca_CA
dc.titleIndividual differences in the energizing effects of caff eine on effort-baseddecision-making tests in ratsca_CA
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_CA
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2018.04.004
dc.relation.projectIDFPI BES-2016-077177 ; FPU AP2010-3793 ; PREDOC/2012/28 ; R03MH094966-01A1 ; PSI2015-68497-Rca_CA
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccessca_CA
dc.relation.publisherVersionhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S009130571730477Xca_CA
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionca_CA


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