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dc.contributor.authorEnrique Roig, Ángel
dc.contributor.authorBretón-López, Juana
dc.contributor.authorMolinari, Guadalupe
dc.contributor.authorBaños, Rosa
dc.contributor.authorBotella, Cristina
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-13T12:16:40Z
dc.date.available2018-03-13T12:16:40Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationENRIQUE, Ángel, et al. Efficacy of an adaptation of the Best Possible Self intervention implemented through positive technology: a randomized control trial. Applied Research in Quality of Life, 2017, p. 1-19.ca_CA
dc.identifier.issn1871-2584
dc.identifier.issn1871-2576
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10234/173341
dc.description.abstractBest possible Self (BPS) is a positive psychological intervention based on positive future thinking. It has been shown to be effective in improving well-being and depressive symptoms over short periods of time. Positive technology is a scientific approach designed to increase well-being through Information and Communication Technologies. To assess the efficacy of the BPS implemented through a positive technology application in improving optimistic thinking, affect and depressive symptoms, during a one-month period, with two follow-ups one and three months later. Randomized, single-blind control trial. Central randomization was performed by an independent researcher using computer software to generate lists allocating participants to treatments. Recruitment was carried out through advertisements at two universities. Randomized participants were 78 young adults who were assigned to the e-BPS condition (n = 38) or to a control group (n = 40). Participants were asked to visualize their BPS each day using a Positive Technology Application. The Control condition consisted of thinking and writing about daily activities, also through technologies. Affect, future expectations, and depressive symptoms were measured in different time frames. 78 participants were analyzed using intention-to-treat analyses. Results showed that BPS was effective in improving future expectations measures and reducing depressive symptoms until the post-training. However, these effects were not maintained in the three-month follow-up period. This study indicates that BPS can be effectively adapted for implementation through positive technologies. Factors such as the variety of exercises and the instructions can play a role in maintaining the changes in the long term.ca_CA
dc.format.extent19 p.ca_CA
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfca_CA
dc.language.isoengca_CA
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagca_CA
dc.relation.isPartOfApplied Research in Quality of Life, 2017ca_CA
dc.rights© Springer International Publishing AG. This is a pre-print of an article published in Applied Research in Quality of Life. The final authenticated version is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11482-017-9552-5ca_CA
dc.subjectbest possible selfca_CA
dc.subjectfuture thinkingca_CA
dc.subjectpositive psychological interventionca_CA
dc.subjectpositive technologyca_CA
dc.subjectoptimismca_CA
dc.subjectwell-beingca_CA
dc.titleEfficacy of an adaptation of the Best Possible Self intervention implemented through positive technology: a randomized control trialca_CA
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_CA
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11482-017-9552-5
dc.relation.projectIDJaume I University grant PREDOC/2012/51ca_CA
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_CA
dc.relation.publisherVersionhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11482-017-9552-5ca_CA
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/submittedVersionca_CA


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