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dc.contributor.authorHernández Blasi, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorMondéjar Sebastián, Laura
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-11T07:57:40Z
dc.date.available2018-12-11T07:57:40Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-31
dc.identifier.citationHERNÁNDEZ BLASI, Carlos; MONDÉJAR SEBASTIÁN, Laura (2018). Testing the Kundera Hypothesis: Does Every Woman (But Not Every Man) Prefer Her Child to Her Mate? Evolutionary Psychology, online 31/10/2018ca_CA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10234/177989
dc.description.abstractThe context of a famous novel by Milan Kundera (Immortality) suggests that when faced with a life-or-death situation, every woman would prefer to save her child than her husband, left hanging whether every man would do the same. We labeled this as the Kundera hypothesis, and the purpose of this study was to test it empirically as we believe it raises a thought-provoking question in evolutionary terms. Specifically, 197 college students (92 women) were presented a questionnaire where they had to make different decisions about four dilemmas about who to save (their mate or their offspring) in two hypothetical life-or-death situations: a home fire and a car crash. These dilemmas involved two different mate ages (a 25- or a 40-year-old mate) and two offspring ages (1- or a 6-year-old child). For comparative purposes, we also included complementary life-or-death dilemmas on both a sibling and an offspring, and a sibling and a cousin. The results generally supported the Kundera hypothesis: Although the majority of men and women made the decision to save their offspring instead of their mate, about 18% of men on average (unlike the 5% of women) consistently decided to save their mate across the four dilemmas in the two life-or-death situations. These data were interpreted with reference to Hamilton’s inclusive fitness theory, the preferential role of women as kin keepers, and the evolution of altruism toward friends and mates.ca_CA
dc.format.extent9 p.ca_CA
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfca_CA
dc.language.isoengca_CA
dc.publisherSAGEca_CA
dc.relation.isPartOfEvolutionary Psychology (2018), online 31/10/2018ca_CA
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/*
dc.subjectAltruismca_CA
dc.subjectKin selectionca_CA
dc.subjectInclusive fitnessca_CA
dc.subjectMatingca_CA
dc.subjectLife-or-death situationsca_CA
dc.subjectEvolutionary psychologyca_CA
dc.titleTesting the Kundera Hypothesis: Does Every Woman (But Not Every Man) Prefer Her Child to Her Mate?ca_CA
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_CA
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/1474704918808864
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_CA
dc.relation.publisherVersionhttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1474704918808864ca_CA
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionca_CA


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Atribución-NoComercial 4.0 Internacional
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