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dc.contributor.authorMartínez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada
dc.contributor.authorJohannsen, Florian
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-08T07:00:07Z
dc.date.available2018-06-08T07:00:07Z
dc.date.issued2018-05
dc.identifier.citationMARTÍNEZ ZARZOSO, Inmaculada; JOHANNSEN, Florian. (2018). What Explains Indirect Exports of Goods and Services in Eastern Europe and Central Asia? Empirica, v. 45, Issue 2, p. 283–309ca_CA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10234/175035
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates the determinants of indirect exporting, using firm- level data for 27 countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Indirect exporting depends on a combination of fixed and variable trade cost factors. We first hypothesize that firms that perceive customs, transportation, crime and legal sys- tems as severe obstacles anticipate higher fixed costs and are more likely to export indirectly. The second hypothesis is that indirect exporting tends to be a temporary strategy. Econometric models are used to test the first hypothesis and transition matrices to test the second. In particular, probit, Heckman-probit and fractional response models are estimated to analyse the determinants of the export mode and the share of indirect exports. The results indicate that the factors that account for the fixed cost of exporting, mainly affect the decision to export indirectly (extensive margin), but some of them also affect, to a lesser extent, the amount exported indirectly (intensive margin). More specifically, factors such as customs and trade restrictions and transportation obstacles affect the extensive margin only, whereas crime affects both margins. Secondly, trade agreement membership mainly affects trade in manufactured goods, while exchange rate volatility affects positively the extensive and intensive margin of indirect exports of services. The results also indicate that firms are more likely to change their status as an indirect exporter than they are to change their status as a direct exporter or a non-exporter, which provides support to the second hypothesis.ca_CA
dc.format.extent35 p.ca_CA
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfca_CA
dc.language.isoengca_CA
dc.publisherSpringerca_CA
dc.relation.isPartOfEmpirica (2018), v. 45, Issue 2ca_CA
dc.subjectIntermediariesca_CA
dc.subjectIndirect exportingca_CA
dc.subjectEastern Europeca_CA
dc.subjectCentral Asiaca_CA
dc.subjectUncertaintyca_CA
dc.titleWhat Explains Indirect Exports of Goods and Services in Eastern Europe and Central Asia?ca_CA
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_CA
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10663-016-9361-3
dc.relation.projectIDFinancial support from the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness is grateful acknowledged (ECO2014-58991-C3-2-R).ca_CA
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_CA
dc.relation.publisherVersionhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10663-016-9361-3ca_CA
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionca_CA


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