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dc.contributor.authorElías Hernández, Sergio
dc.contributor.authorBarrós Loscertales, Alfonso Roberto
dc.contributor.authorXiao, Yaqiong
dc.contributor.authorGonzález Mora, José Luis
dc.contributor.authorRubia, Katya
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-06T10:42:27Z
dc.date.available2018-06-06T10:42:27Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0306-4522
dc.identifier.issn1873-7544
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10234/175002
dc.description.abstractAbstract—Some meditation techniques teach the practitioner to achieve the state of mental silence. The aim ofthis study was to investigate brain regions that are associated with their volume and functional connectivity(FC) with the depth of mental silence in long-term practitioners of Sahaja Yoga Meditation. Twenty-three long-term practitioners of this meditation were scanned using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to identify theneural correlates of the depth of mental silence, we tested which gray matter volumes (GMV) were correlated withthe depth of mental silence and which regions these areas were functionally connected to under a meditation con-dition. GMV in medial prefrontal cortex including rostral anterior cingulate cortex were positively correlated withthe subjective perception of the depth of mental silence inside the scanner. Furthermore, there was significantlyincreased FC between this area and bilateral anterior insula/putamen during a meditation-state specifically, whiledecreased connectivity with the right thalamus/parahippocampal gyrus was present during the meditation-stateand the resting-state. The capacity of long-term meditators to establish a durable state of mental silence insidean MRI scanner was associated with larger gray matter volume in a medial frontal region that is crucial for top-down cognitive, emotion and attention control. This is furthermore corroborated by increased FC of this regionduring the meditation-state with bilateral anterior insula/putamen, which are important for interoception, emotion,and attention regulation. The findings hence suggest that the depth of mental silence is associated with medialfronto-insular-striatal networks that are crucial for top-down attention and emotional control.ca_CA
dc.format.extent12 p.ca_CA
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfca_CA
dc.language.isoengca_CA
dc.publisherElsevierca_CA
dc.relation.isPartOfNeuroscience Volume 371, 10 February 2018ca_CA
dc.rights306-4522/Ó 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of IBRO.This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)ca_CA
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectostral anterior cingulate cortexca_CA
dc.subjectanterior insulaca_CA
dc.subjectfunctional connectivityca_CA
dc.subjectVBMca_CA
dc.subjectfMRIca_CA
dc.subjectMeditationca_CA
dc.titleGray Matter and Functional Connectivity in Anterior Cingulate Cortexare Associated with the State of Mental Silence During Sahaja YogaMeditationca_CA
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_CA
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2017.12.017
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_CA
dc.relation.publisherVersionhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306452217309077ca_CA
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionca_CA


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306-4522/Ó 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of IBRO.This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as 306-4522/Ó 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of IBRO.This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)