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dc.contributor.authorArbona, Vicent
dc.contributor.authorManzi, Matías
dc.contributor.authorDe Ollas Valverde, Carlos José
dc.contributor.authorGómez Cadenas, Aurelio
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-26T10:32:01Z
dc.date.available2017-07-26T10:32:01Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationArbona, V.; Manzi, M.; Ollas, C.D.; Gómez-Cadenas, A. Metabolomics as a Tool to Investigate Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2013, 14, 4885-4911.ca_CA
dc.identifier.issn1661-6596
dc.identifier.issn1422-0067
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10234/168409
dc.description.abstractMetabolites reflect the integration of gene expression, protein interaction and other different regulatory processes and are therefore closer to the phenotype than mRNA transcripts or proteins alone. Amongst all –omics technologies, metabolomics is the most transversal and can be applied to different organisms with little or no modifications. It has been successfully applied to the study of molecular phenotypes of plants in response to abiotic stress in order to find particular patterns associated to stress tolerance. These studies have highlighted the essential involvement of primary metabolites: sugars, amino acids and Krebs cycle intermediates as direct markers of photosynthetic dysfunction as well as effectors of osmotic readjustment. On the contrary, secondary metabolites are more specific of genera and species and respond to particular stress conditions as antioxidants, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) scavengers, coenzymes, UV and excess radiation screen and also as regulatory molecules. In addition, the induction of secondary metabolites by several abiotic stress conditions could also be an effective mechanism of cross-protection against biotic threats, providing a link between abiotic and biotic stress responses. Moreover, the presence/absence and relative accumulation of certain metabolites along with gene expression data provides accurate markers (mQTL or MWAS) for tolerant crop selection in breeding programs.ca_CA
dc.format.extent27 p.ca_CA
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfca_CA
dc.language.isoengca_CA
dc.publisherMDPIca_CA
dc.relation.isPartOfInt. J. Mol. Sci. 2013, 14, 4885-4911ca_CA
dc.rights© 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).ca_CA
dc.rightsAtribución 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectcoldca_CA
dc.subjectheatca_CA
dc.subjectmetabolite profilingca_CA
dc.subjectmQTLca_CA
dc.subjectomicsca_CA
dc.subjectosmoprotectantsca_CA
dc.subjectoxidative stressca_CA
dc.subjectsalt stressca_CA
dc.subjectsoil floodingca_CA
dc.subjectwater stressca_CA
dc.titleMetabolomics as a Tool to Investigate Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plantsca_CA
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_CA
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms14034885
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_CA
dc.relation.publisherVersionhttp://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/14/3/4885ca_CA


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© 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article
distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license
(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).