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dc.contributor.authorRandall, Patrick A. 
dc.contributor.authorLee, Christie A.
dc.contributor.authorPodurgiel, Samantha J. 
dc.contributor.authorHart, Evan 
dc.contributor.authorYohn, Samantha E. 
dc.contributor.authorJones, Myles 
dc.contributor.authorRowland, Margaret 
dc.contributor.authorLópez Cruz, Laura 
dc.contributor.authorCorrea Sanz, María de las Mercedes
dc.contributor.authorSalamone, John D. 
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-07T11:20:12Z
dc.date.available2016-09-07T11:20:12Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationRANDALL, Patrick A., et al. Bupropion increases selection of high effort activity in rats tested on a progressive ratio/chow feeding choice procedure: implications for treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms. International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 2015, 1-11ca_CA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10234/162280
dc.description.abstractBackground: Depression and related disorders are characterized by deficits in behavioral activation, exertion of effort, and other psychomotor/motivational dysfunctions. Depressed patients show alterations in effort-related decision making and a bias towards selection of low effort activities. It has been suggested that animal tests of effort-related decision making could be useful as models of motivational dysfunctions seen in psychopathology. Methods: Because clinical studies have suggested that inhibition of catecholamine uptake may be a useful strategy for treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms, the present research assessed the ability of bupropion to increase work output in rats responding on a test of effort-related decision-making (ie, a progressive ratio/chow feeding choice task). With this task, rats can choose between working for a preferred food (high-carbohydrate pellets) by lever pressing on a progressive ratio schedule vs obtaining a less preferred laboratory chow that is freely available in the chamber. Results: Bupropion (10.0–40.0 mg/kg intraperitoneal) significantly increased all measures of progressive ratio lever pressing, but decreased chow intake. These effects were greatest in animals with low baseline levels of work output on the progressive ratio schedule. Because accumbens dopamine is implicated in effort-related processes, the effects of bupropion on markers of accumbens dopamine transmission were examined. Bupropion elevated extracellular dopamine levels in accumbens core as measured by microdialysis and increased phosphorylated dopamine and cyclic-AMP related phosphoprotein 32 kDaltons (pDARPP-32) immunoreactivity in a manner consistent with D1 and D2 receptor stimulation. Conclusion: The ability of bupropion to increase exertion of effort in instrumental behavior may have implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms in humans.ca_CA
dc.description.sponsorShipThis work was supported by a grant to J.D.S. from the National Institute of Mental Health (MH094966) and to M.C. from U. Jaume I (P1.1 A 2013-01) and UCONN SURF grants to M.R. and M.J.ca_CA
dc.format.extent11 p.ca_CA
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfca_CA
dc.language.isoengca_CA
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressca_CA
dc.relation.isPartOfInternational Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 2015, 1-11ca_CA
dc.rights© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.comca_CA
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/es/*
dc.subjectdopamineca_CA
dc.subjectnucleus accumbensca_CA
dc.subjectdepressionca_CA
dc.subjectfatigueca_CA
dc.subjectanimal modelsca_CA
dc.titleBupropion Increases Selection of High Effort Activity in Rats Tested on a Progressive Ratio/Chow Feeding Choice Procedure: Implications for Treatment of Effort-Related Motivational Symptomsca_CA
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_CA
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ijnp/pyu017
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_CA
dc.relation.publisherVersionhttp://ijnp.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/01/07/ijnp.pyu017ca_CA
dc.editionpdf de la editorialca_CA


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© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com