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dc.contributor.authorBueichekú, Elisenda
dc.contributor.authorMiró-Padilla, Anna
dc.contributor.authorPalomar-García, María-Ángeles
dc.contributor.authorVentura Campos, Noelia
dc.contributor.authorParcet Ibars, María Antonia
dc.contributor.authorBarrós Loscertales, Alfonso Roberto
dc.contributor.authorAvila, Cesar
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-28T11:20:53Z
dc.date.available2016-07-28T11:20:53Z
dc.date.issued2016-07
dc.identifier.citationBUEICHEKÚ, Elisenda, et al. Reduced posterior parietal cortex activation after training on a visual search task. NeuroImage, 2016, vol. 135, p. 204-213.ca_CA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10234/162041
dc.description.abstractGaining experience on a cognitive task improves behavioral performance and is thought to enhance brain efficiency. Despite the body of literature already published on the effects of training on brain activation, less research has been carried out on visual search attention processes under well controlled conditions. Thirty-six healthy adults divided into trained and control groups completed a pre-post letter-based visual search task fMRI study in one day. Twelve letters were used as targets and ten as distractors. The trained group completed a training session (840 trials) with half the targets between scans. The effects of training were studied at the behavioral and brain levels by controlling for repetition effects using both between-subjects (trained vs. control groups) and within-subject (trained vs. untrained targets) controls. The trained participants reduced their response speed by 31% as a result of training, maintaining their accuracy scores, whereas the control group hardly changed. Neural results revealed that brain changes associated with visual search training were circumscribed to reduced activation in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) when controlling for group, and they included inferior occipital areas when controlling for targets. The observed behavioral and brain changes are discussed in relation to automatic behavior development. The observed training-related decreases could be associated with increased neural efficiency in specific key regions for task performance.ca_CA
dc.description.sponsorShipThis research has been supported by grants from the Spanish Department of Economy and Competitiveness (PSI2013-47504-R), and the Universitat Jaume I (P1•1B2013-63). Authors EB, AMP, and MAPG have been supported by pre-doctoral graduate program grants (National FPU to EB; Universitat Jaume I FPI to AMP; and National FPI to MAPG).ca_CA
dc.format.extent9 p.ca_CA
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfca_CA
dc.language.isoengca_CA
dc.publisherElsevierca_CA
dc.relation.isPartOfNeuroImage Volume 135, 15 July 2016ca_CA
dc.rights© 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.ca_CA
dc.subjectAttentionca_CA
dc.subjectAutomaticityca_CA
dc.subjectFunctional Magnetic Resonance Imagingca_CA
dc.subjectPriority mapsca_CA
dc.subjectVisual selectionca_CA
dc.titleReduced posterior parietal cortex activation after training on a visual search taskca_CA
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_CA
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.04.059
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccessca_CA
dc.relation.publisherVersionhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053811916300994ca_CA


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