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dc.contributor.authorTorres Peiró, Salvador
dc.contributor.authorGonzález Ausejo, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorMendoza Yero, Omel
dc.contributor.authorMínguez Vega, Gladys
dc.contributor.authorLancis, Jesús
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-06T11:29:18Z
dc.date.available2015-07-06T11:29:18Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-01
dc.identifier.citationTORRES PEIRÓ, S...[et al.]. Femtosecond laser micromachining with extended depth of focus by using diffractive lenses. Applied Surface Science v. 303, (June 2014), pp 393–398ca_CA
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10234/126326
dc.description.abstractWe show that a simple diffraction focusing element can alleviate mechanical tolerances in ultrafast laser microprocessing. In particular, we experimentally demonstrate that, in comparison with a conventional refractive lens (RL), focusing light pulses of 30 fs onto a stainless steel sample with a diffractive lens (DL) can increase twice the useful axial ablation region. This is thanks to the combination of the broadband spectrum of ultrashort pulses, and the huge longitudinal chromatic aberration associated with DLs. We believe that our results might be useful for reducing the complexity and cost of ultrafast microprocessing systems.ca_CA
dc.format.extent6 p.ca_CA
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfca_CA
dc.language.isoengca_CA
dc.publisherElsevierca_CA
dc.relation.isPartOfApplied Surface Science v. 303, (June 2014)ca_CA
dc.subjectDiffractive lensesca_CA
dc.subjectFemtosecond micromachiningca_CA
dc.titleFemtosecond laser micromachining with extended depth of focus by using diffractive lensesca_CA
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_CA
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2014.03.012
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccessca_CA
dc.relation.publisherVersionWe show that a simple diffraction focusing element can alleviate mechanical tolerances in ultrafast laser microprocessing. In particular, we experimentally demonstrate that, in comparison with a conventional refractive lens (RL), focusing light pulses of 30 fs onto a stainless steel sample with a diffractive lens (DL) can increase twice the useful axial ablation region. This is thanks to the combination of the broadband spectrum of ultrashort pulses, and the huge longitudinal chromatic aberration associated with DLs. We believe that our results might be useful for reducing the complexity and cost of ultrafast microprocessing systemsca_CA


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