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dc.contributor.authorOrtega-Roldán, Blanca
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez-Ruiz, Sonia
dc.contributor.authorPerakakis, Pandelis
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Santaella, M. Carmen
dc.contributor.authorVila, Jaime
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-15T15:35:33Z
dc.date.available2015-06-15T15:35:33Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationOrtega-Roldán B, Rodríguez-Ruiz S, Perakakis P, Fernández-Santaella MC, Vila J (2014) The Emotional and Attentional Impact of Exposure to One's Own Body in Bulimia Nervosa: A Physiological View. PLoS ONE 9(7): e102595. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102595ca_CA
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10234/123664
dc.description.abstractBackground: Body dissatisfaction is the most relevant body image disturbance in bulimia nervosa (BN). Research has shown that viewing one’s own body evokes negative thoughts and emotions in individuals with BN. However, the psychophysiological mechanisms involved in this negative reaction have not yet been clearly established. Our aim was to examine the emotional and attentional processes that are activated when patients with BN view their own bodies. Method: We examined the effects of viewing a video of one’s own body on the physiological (eye-blink startle, cardiac defense, and skin conductance) and subjective (pleasure, arousal, and control ratings) responses elicited by a burst of 110 dB white noise of 500 ms duration. The participants were 30 women with BN and 30 healthy control women. The experimental task consisted of two consecutive and counterbalanced presentations of the auditory stimulus preceded, alternatively, by a video of the participant’s own body versus no such video. Results: The results showed that, when viewing their own bodies, women with BN experienced (a) greater inhibition of the startle reflex, (b) greater cardiac acceleration in the first component of the defense reaction, (c) greater skin conductance response, and (d) less subjective pleasure and control combined with greater arousal, compared with the control participants. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that, for women with BN, peripheral-physiological responses to self-images are dominated by attentional processes, which provoke an immobility reaction caused by a dysfunctional negative response to their own bodyca_CA
dc.format.extent10 p.ca_CA
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfca_CA
dc.language.isoengca_CA
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceca_CA
dc.relation.isPartOfPLoS ONE, July 2014, Volume 9, Issue 7, e102595ca_CA
dc.rights© 2014 Ortega-Roldán et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.ca_CA
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 Spain*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/es/*
dc.titleThe Emotional and Attentional Impact of Exposure to One’s Own Body in Bulimia Nervosa: A Physiological Viewca_CA
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_CA
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102595
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_CA
dc.relation.publisherVersionhttp://www.plosone.org/article/fetchObject.action?uri=info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0102595&representation=PDFca_CA


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© 2014 Ortega-Roldán et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2014 Ortega-Roldán et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.